Wednesday, June 12, 2013

The Altered Page: Buried Treasure

The Altered Page: Buried Treasure: The Continuing Education of a Perennial Art Student . . .Lesson Learned: "Deluge After Drought"


Here is a piece I struggled with for quite some time.  It has quite a few more layers of various papers and paint than I frequently use in my work, and at several stages in it's creation, looked quite different than it looks, above, in it's final incarnation.  At times I thought that I had "overworked" parts of it, and I also kept fighting the urge to give the piece a strong focal point of some kind (even in my non objective artwork like this piece there is usually some sort of center-of-interest), as I really wanted to focus on texture, pattern, and repetition, here.  I put the unfinished piece away for a month or more, and thought about elements that would  bring the composition more in line with the mental image I had of it.  When I hauled it out, again to work on it, I only ended up changing things slightly by adding several new elements to the composition.  Having done so, I knew it was complete.  Lesson learned: giving a piece I am working on some time, by putting it away and leaving it in an unfinished state for awhile, helps me to process, and can actually give the artwork the space and time it needs, as well, to tell me what needs to happen next!

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

"No Brain for Math and Science:" My Interview in Featuring Magazine

The upcoming issue of Featuring Magazine: Art Journaling, Mixed Media and More. . . includes an interview where the editors of the magazine asked me a number of questions about my 'awakening' as an artist during my high school years, my development as an art student at the California College of Arts and Crafts in the Bay Area in the 1960's, and the fascination with mixed media in my current work.  The article, which includes images of 9 pieces of my work, is titled "No Brain for Math and Science," a direct quote from an answer to one of the questions Featuring's editors asked me.  The current issue of Featuring (issue #4) has been sent to the printers and is available for pre-sale on the magazine's website, featuringmagazine.com. It will be ready for mailing to readers in about two weeks.  If you are interested in collage, mixed media, art journaling, and a world of related topics from an international community of artists, and are not familiar with this amazing new art magazine, you are truly missing something special.  


Wednesday, May 8, 2013

My Sketchbook

"and when the war was over"

This is an example of the kind of collage and mixed media pieces I frequently create in my sketchbook.  They tend to be a lot more "spare," with more white space surrounding the imagery, than many of the more formal pieces I create as separate works.  In my sketchbook, there are no "rules," and because of that, it is the place where I feel totally free to explore; to both create, and to destroy.  It is also the place where some of my most creative ideas germinate and begin to grow, so, in the long run, it becomes a wonderful resource for other creative pursuits.  I have not made the time to work in my sketchbook, much, lately, and, when this happens, I find myself less happy; more on-edge.  It is something that I need to change!  And, soon! 

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

Lesson Learned: "Deluge After Drought"

Here is a piece I struggled with for quite some time.  It has quite a few more layers of various papers and paint than I frequently use in my work, and at several stages in it's creation, looked quite different than it looks, above, in it's final incarnation.  At times, I thought that I had "overworked" parts of it, and I also kept fighting the urge to give the piece a strong focal point of some kind (even in my non-objective artwork, like this piece, there is usually some sort of center-of-interest), as I really wanted to focus on texture, pattern, and repetition, here.  I put the unfinished piece away for a month or more, and thought about elements that would bring the piece more in line with the mental image I had of it.  When I hauled it out, again to work on it, I only ended up changing things slightly by adding several new elements to the composition.  Having done so, I knew it was complete.  Lesson learned: giving a piece I am working on some time, by putting it away and leaving it an unfinished state for awhile, helps me to process, and can actually give the artwork the space and time it needs, as well, to tell me what needs to happen next!    

Sunday, December 16, 2012

Seth Apter's 5 x 5 Project



A number of blog posts ago, I showed images of the three 5 x 5 projects that I created for Seth Apter's "5 x 5 Project," an online extension of his book The Pulse of Mixed Media.  The prompts for which he asked us to create artwork were as follows: 1)If your artwork could talk, what would it say?  2)Who has had the most impact on your creative life?  3)What is one thing you have never shared with the creative community?  Each prompt was to be "answered" with a piece of artwork 5" x 5" square.  The artwork could include other visual elements, but was to be primarily based on some sort of written text or typography.  Since much of my work incorporates the written word in some form, I felt that this was a creative endeavor I could not turn down, and I had a wonderful time in the studio coming up with my visual responses to his prompts.    I created a 5 x 5 piece for each of the three prompts, and mailed them to Seth in NYC.  The magazine Somerset Studio found out about this project, and did a 10-page article on it, in their November/December, 2012 issue.  To my complete amazement, my "If your artwork could talk. . ." piece was included in this article.  One or more of the pieces I created for this project will be included in Seth's blog post on the 5 x 5 Project on his blog, The Altered Page (thealteredpage.blogspot.com), this coming Sunday, December 23rd.

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

The Pulse Charity Auction for Hurricane Sandy Relief


Long Walk Home

Hurricane Sandy has created havoc and devastation in the lives of many people in the Northeastern portion of the U.S..  New York City mixed media artist, and blogger (thealteredpage.blogspot.com), Seth Apter, feeling powerless in the face of a tragedy of this magnitude, has decided to do something to help out.  He is running auctions of several "bundles" (as of 11/7/12 there are 8, with MORE to come!) of new art books, and original artwork, by himself, and others.  I have chosen to create a piece called Long Walk Home to donate to the cause.  100% of the monies he collects from these auctions will be donated to The Mayor's Fund to Advance New York City, and, in turn, 100% of this fund id used to directly benefit the victims of Hurricane Sandy.  (To date-11/7/12- he has collected more than $1000.00 from these auctions!)  You can view the auction items in the bundles, and get further information on his blog, The Altered Page.  You may place a bid on an auction bundle by emailing him at shap97@gmail.com.

Saturday, October 27, 2012

The Perks of Creating an ATC

This is an ATC that I recently created, called "Off the Radar."  Much of my work is fairly small in size (9" x 12" or smaller), but I find it challenging, and fun, to work in the even smaller ATC 2.5" x 3.5" size, and still attempt to incorporate all of the materials and kinds of imagery I use in the larger pieces. Because of the small size, the process is frequently spontaneous, and intuitive enough that it has the ability to ameliorate some of the pressure and angst that can arise when working on a larger piece, and trying to get everything "just right."  When I have the time, I try to complete work of this smaller size, from start to finish, at one sitting.